NORTHEAST GEORGIA MOUNTAINS

ATTRACTIONS

AGRI-TOURISM SITES:

Agriculture is the foundation of every culture and group of people.  There are many special places to visit that have some type of agricultural aspect.  These sites include roadside produce stands, wildlife and game preserves, heritage farms, hunting preserves, fish hatcheries, grist mills and livestock auction barns.  An old agricultural product, but new to the southeast is wine and scattered throughout Northeast Georgia are a variety of wineries and vineyards, each with a special flavor and appearance.

Corn Mazes

Farmer's Markets

Rodeos

The Flat Creek Arena in Franklin County, Georgia with its bulls, broncs, barrels and other western trappings, is a long ride from Cheyenne, WY or Prescott AZ.  Yes, it is a "fur piece" in both miles and years from the first rodeos of the late 1800s.  Yet in early September, the same kind of competition to see who's best, along with the exuberant celebration of a colorful lifestyle, are close at hand and close to heart.  The Flat Creek Championship Rodeo is a major Professional Cowboy Association (PCA) event.  Check out www.pcarodeo.com to find out the date this rodeo is held each year.  Tickets can be bought at many of the businessses in and around Royston, Georgia.

Wineries & Vineyards

Most wineries have tours & tastings but are different in appearance and size of operation.  With 10 wineries and vineyards in Northeast Georgia alone, Georgia’s wine industry is booming! Northeast Georgia wineries are exploding with vinis vinifera varital; a special class of European grapes grown for crafting fine quality wines. Each winery has a special personality of its own. Before prohibition, Georgia was sixth in the country in wine production, until 1920 when the 18th Amendment brought it to a halt. It was not until the early 1980’s that wineries and vineyards started popping up again in Northeast Georgia. The microclimate in the Northeast Georgia Mountains is ideal fro growing vinifera grapes, and the altitude is high enough to prevent the spread of some deadly diseases. The steep red-clay hillsides of North Georgia mirror the "Terra Rosa" (meaning red earth) soils of some of Europe's most famous wine-growing areas. 

The State of Georgia recently passed legislation creating the “Georgia Wine Highway” that will tie the wineries in the state together through signage.  Other winery/vineyard related sites include: Georgia Wine Trail & Georgia Wine Country.

AIRPLANE SIGHTSEEING TRIPS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BEACH & WATER PARK

CEMETERIES

CIVIL WAR SITES

Except for raids by Federal cavalry, northeast Georgia escaped destruction during the war. There were few large plantations or slave owners, and the men of the region were just as likely to fight for the Union evade the draft or to desert as they were to serve the Confederacy. Bandits roamed the region, terrorizing isolated farms and small communities, forcing Governor Joseph Brown to dispatch patrols periodically to suppress the anarchy, a largely useless effort in the mountainous wilderness.

Dawson was a Unionist stronghold troubled by guerrilla groups like McCallum's Scouts, a collection of outlaws, renegades, and deserters. Food production suffered, and wide-scale hunger was commonplace. Returning Southern soldiers hunted down the renegades, resulting in feuds that continued for decades.

Jefferson Davis began his flight through Georgia along the southern edge of this area. He was accompanied by two separate treasures: the Confederacy treasury and deposits of several Richmond banks.

COVERED BRIDGES

Many people think the reason bridges were covered was to keep horses and wagons dry. The real reason, however, was to protect the bridge itself. Wood exposed to the elements decays faster than that which is protected, and a roof would protect the bridge's important structural members in the span. Periodic replacement of the roof would be far simpler (and cheaper) to replace that repairing the timbers below.

In spite of this rather economical reason, most would have to agree that a covered bridge enhances the country landscape. An excursion to investigate an old weatherworn covered bridge can have the effect of bringing one back to a simpler time. If you have a chance to visit a covered bridge, you might want to take a few moments to sit quietly by the river. You just might hear the squeak of wagon wheels and the thud of hoofs echoing from inside the old wooden bridge. Northeast Georgia has five of these architectural treasures left…

FYI… Watson Mill Bridge is the longest covered bridge in Georgia and the Stovall Mill Covered Bridge is the shortest covered bridge in Georgia! 

FALL & LEAF CHANGE

Fall is an alluring time in the Mountains of Northeast Georgia.  Warm, sunny days and crisp cool evenings. It's a time to get out one last time before Winter descends and cold weather restricts our activities.  It's a time to explore and reconnect with Mother Nature in one of her most glorious stages of life. So plan to visit the mountains, there are a variety of ways and a number of beautiful drives just waiting for you and your family.

GARDENS, GARDEN SHOPS & SPECIALTY NURSERIES

Throughout the Northeast Georgia, you will find a variety of gardens. The Fred Hamilton Rhododendron Garden in Hiawassee has over 2,000 rhododendron & azalea plants and wildflowers.

GOLD MINES & GOLD PANNING

GRIST MILLS

In the early 1900's, most rural communities had a gristmill where residents could take their grain to be ground into meal or flour. At one time, Georgia has close to 1200 of the watered-powered wonders. Although they are no longer common, there are a few gristmills still operating that grind fresh corn and other grains and offer these products for sale to the public; some also offer custom grinding services. Call ahead to assure availability and hours of operation before making the trip to one of these facilities. The following are operational water-powered gristmills still in existence in Northeast Georgia:

HISTORIC COURTHOUSES

Georgia has 159 courthouses, each of which serve as the county seat.  The reason Georgia has so many is because the Legislature proclaimed that no citizen should be more than a day's ride from a courthouse.  The Courthouse is a repository of deeds, mineral claims, and other official government documents relating to county activities.  Northeast Georgia has most of it's historic courthouses standing.

LIVING HISTORY

MILITARY (VETERAN) MEMORIALS, MONUMENTS & PARKS

MONUMENTS & MEMORIAL PARKS

MUSEUMS & SPECIAL PLACES - EDUCATIONAL, HISTORICAL & FUN

Explore the area's history, culture and ingenuity at some of our fine museums. Some are small and out of the way, while others are easy to find and very unique. Man has an ingenious way of creating places that touch our hearts, minds and spirits.

NATIVE AMERICAN SITES

NATURE BASED SITES & ACTIVITIES (includes wildlife preserves, petting zoos, and nature centers)

NEW DEAL ART: A Guide to Post Office Murals and Sculpture in Northeast Georgia

PLANETARIUMS

RACE TRACKS, SPEEDWAYS & DRAGSTRIPS

ROADSIDE HISTORICAL MARKERS

Dotting the landscape are historical markers telling the story of Northeast Georgia...it's Indian history, it's gold rush history, and it's pioneer history.  So in your travels, plan to stop and look into Northeast Georgia's past.  It will bring you that much closer to who lived in these mountains and foothills and what made them special.

TRAILS, TOURS & SCENIC BYWAYS

WALKING TOURS

Stop by the local Chambers of Commerce, Convention & Visitor Bureaus, or Welcome Center office to pick up a copy of these popular Walking Tours.

WATERFALLS

These multi-faceted wonders dot the region. Some are big & bold, while others are delicate and subtle. Among the more well-known are:

 

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